Tag Archives: Jackson Pollock

10,000 hours

I recently asked a friends nine year-old daughter (Lily) how lacrosse was going.  “It’s a lot of fun, but I’m having a hard time catching the ball.”  Instantly the self appointed expert gene flared and I caught myself lecturing on the importance of “practice.” Practice or punishment in a K-6 thesaurus play book. Continuing, I stuttered with inspiration that I read somewhere that it takes 10,000 hours to become an “expert” (Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell). Her eyes widened and her voice calmly whispered “cool.”  Confused, I thought…did she think I said dollars…not hours…like if you practice, I’ll give you $10,000?  Lily ran off and grabbed her lacrosse stick and darted outside.  I just gave her a 10,000 hour license to have fun.  Need one?

Paul ShampineCheck out these license holders that are great with their stick…
Best, Paul
Paul Shampine


Jennifer Weiss

Dog Run-Jennifer Weiss

When did you first discover your creative talents? I think it was in the 3rd grade. Another student and I would perform these one on one drawing contests and the other students would be the judges (I’m not sure where the teacher was while this was going on). I was told early on that I had some talent, but it took me a very long time to really believe it; as I got older I realized I had to create in some way in order to stay sane. At times I would make paintings or drawings that I’d feel very good about, but it would often be followed by intense doubt and insecurity. It wasn’t until my early thirties, when a professor who I really respected told me I was talented did I actually begin to believe that I might have something worth pursuing. From then on I felt more of a commitment to my work and things really started to grow from that point.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. The first work I ever sold was a group of eight small 8×10″ paintings of coffee cups with a narrative theme. It happened during an open studio weekend in Red Hook where I used to live and work. A couple came in and purchased the entire series altogether for $400 for the eight paintings. I hadn’t expected anyone would really buy a painting from me, and so it came as a total surprise. Fearful they’d change their mind I threw out the first price that came to me. I miss those paintings…

Who are your favorite artists?  Some of my favorite artists include Terry Winters, Enrique Martinez Celaya, Herbert Brandl, and Willem De Kooning.

Artist: Jennifer Weiss
Title: Dog Run
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Dimensions: 72”x72”
Website: http://www.jenweiss.com

Cat Tesla
Endless & Outside of the Box

When did you first discover your creative talents? When I was 3 or 4 years old I made a birthday card for my grandmother using paint and collage, complete with a Hallmark® crown on the back (in goldenrod Crayola®, of course). Since then I’ve been drawing, painting, or making something. I believe it’s who I am part of my genetic code so to say.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold.  Honestly, I don’t remember my first sale! What I do remember is the last day of an art show about 7 years ago when a lady approached me asking about my “Outside of the Box” series. She really liked the work and said she had a wall that she measured and thought that she needed 50 paintings from this series for the spot she had in mind. I replied by saying you mean 15, right? No, she said. Fifty. Five-oh.” I thought she was pulling my leg. She asked me to come to her home after the show to see the space and bring whatever I had left.

My husband was with me and we were on the fence whether to go. She was wearing a t-shirt and shorts. It was very hot. We told her we’d call when we were all packed up. Once we got everything packed up, we figured “why not? Off we went.  It was beautiful. It was big. It was unbelievable!  The wall space was perfect for 50 “Outside of the Box” paintings. She purchased the 15 I had and commissioned me for the other 35.

Life is full of challenges, surprises, and joy. I’ll never forget this experience and how it taught me to be open and to believe that anything is possible. You just never know how God will bless you. I’m grateful for every day as an artist. For me, painting is the most life-affirming thing to do.

Who are your favorite artists?  William Turner, Jackson Pollock, and Georgia O’Keefe.

Artist: Cat Tesla
Title: Endless, 48″x48″, acrylic on canvas – Outside of the Box, 10″x10″/ea, mixed media on birch
Website: http://artbycat.com

Brooke Harker
Taxi 213-Brooke Harker

When did you first discover your creative talents? I grew up in a very creative home…so if I wasn’t putting on a show, making clothing for my troll collection or hosting dance contests between my sister and I (I always judged and won them too…which she never questioned), I was watching my mom paint…I began attending university art classes with her when I was seven, sitting next to her easel. When she worked on her art homework, I got to participate on a parallel project for me, and she taught me about what she was learning. I don’t remember ever not making things.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold.  I was probably five years old painting on rocks from the driveway with my best friend Ashley and trying to sell them for 5 cents each. It was a solid business plan, except we set our table of merchandise at the top of her winding driveway in the woods, private property with no food traffic or passing cars…and then we waited. Where were all the people? Didn’t they see our sign at the bottom of the driveway, “Rocks for Sale” with an arrow? Eventually we moved the rocks to the bottom of the hill, but were still shocked that nobody stopped to buy rocks that were hand painted for only 5 cents!  I’m telling this story…because it is possible that a rock sold before we gave up and started making hors d’oeuvres of graham cracker, frosting and marshmallows and delivering them door to door to our neighbors.

The first offer to buy one of my paintings came when I was 10. My elementary school had an art show in the evening, I wasn’t there but my teacher, Mrs. Smart, let me know that a man who collected children’s art wanted to buy my painting. I don’t remember now if I sold him the painting or held onto it…but I didn’t see it in the years that followed… I mainly remember the turmoil of deciding whether to sell it or not…The offer was for $50. I was shocked. The painting itself was from a class study of Matisse. We took turns posing for the class and painting Matisse inspired backgrounds. I was the only student to paint the boy modeling purple. I gave no explanations at the time. Perhaps the idea seemed original or abstract, but in truth I didn’t want to be racist. I had learned on Martin Luther King Jr Day not to pay attention to a persons skin color, and now I was about to paint Eric, the only African American boy in my class…If I chose brown paint…it would have meant I saw his skin color and I surely didn’t want to be racist…so I made him purple…but I still felt odd about the choice. Again another possible first sale…I for sure remember selling a painting of elephants when I was in high school to my elementary school guidance counselor.

Who are your favorite artists?  Rachael McCampbellChris ZambonRoderick SmithChuck Guppert, Paul GarveyMichael FlohrAshley HaganGregg Chadwick,Wendy MorrisMike Brouse, Carolyn ColeDaphne StammerGabrielle PoolRimi Yang,  James VerbickyClaudia Concha PereaBobby Logic, Charles Crossley, Hilary TaubMolly CourcelleMichael SituJean-Michel BasquiatPicasso, Renoir.

Artist: Brooke Harker
Title: Taxi 213
Medium: Japanese ink, oil and acrylic on canvas
Dimensions: 36″ x 48″
Website: http://www.brookeharker.com

Kellie Thomas-Walker
The Invited-Kellie Thomas-Walker

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was brought up with a love for art originating from my artist mother. I dabbled here and there between creative writing, poetry, never centering on a creative outlet. Then, after many obstacles and many heartbreaks I started to take up sketching.  My threshold to cross which brought me into my world of colors, lines, and beauty was the progression of becoming a mother to my four daughters.  One day my mother set me in front of a canvas, with unlimited paint, brushes-and let me go. That day I found myself, and the world around me has forever changed.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold.  My most treasured piece I sold was a commission piece to our dear friends.  They gave me a color pallet to run off of, and gave me complete free artistic reign.  Three panels, reaching close to 10 ft across came to known as “New Jerusalem”. I poured my soul into that piece. It was where I started prayer to God in my work. A constant connection to Him.

Who are your favorite artists?  Without a doubt my all time favorite is my mother, Diane Heesen. She is such an amazing woman, and diverse in her artistic nature. My other favorites are Osnat Tzadoc, and Salvador Dali. Dali is a definite influence in my charcoal/pen drawings.

Artist: Kellie Thomas-Walker
Title: The Invited
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
Dimensions: 48”x48”
Website: http://kelliewalkerabstractartist.blogspot.com/


“Art is not…” Interview with an Artist, part 4

“Inspired” by Mr. Sadler’s comments below, I’ve found what others have to say what “art is not…”  I open with my friend Pablo and close with some reality:

Art is not the application of a canon of beauty but what the instinct and the brain can conceive beyond any canon. When we love a woman we don’t start measuring her limbs.” ~ Pablo Picasso

Art is not an investment” – VIDEOArne Glimcher, founder of Pace Gallery.

Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.”  ~ Edgar Degas

One of many collections – daughter Samantha @ 7, now 12 years old

“Start by remembering that teaching children about art is not just about showing them how to recognize a van Gogh or Picasso, it’s about preparing young minds for a future of invaluable experiences—art related or otherwise.” by Andrea Mulder-Slater (http://www.kinderart.com/artspeak/important.shtml)

Art is not a luxury.” Fresh Artists (http://www.freshartists.org), a non profit 501(c)(3) organization, created to help save art making in K-12 public schools.

The interviews continue….
Best, Paul
Paul Shampine

Roger Sadler, Temple TX

I am never inspired. Art is work. And I work. Within the process of work I may get excited about an idea and follow it out. Work and ideas. No inspiration: that is a late 19th early/ 20th century concept. Sorry to contradict you but making art is not magic; and inspiration bespeaks of magic. To conclude, art is work and ideas.

When did you first discover your creative talents? 14 years old.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. Selling The Leaving for 600 dollars was my biggest sell and biggest painting and most dear to me. THE LEAVING is not a horror painting despite appearances. It is about pain. The pain of a relationship breaking up and the child being abandoned, or being left with the clan behind the fence. The male is exiting the front of the picture. He is slumped with grief and depression. The women stays behind with the child, holding her hand. The characters are so depressed and in so much pain that “the flesh is stripped from their bones.” The painting is medium large, 5 ft x 5 ft.

The other painting is PURPLE PAINTING. It is an example of my current painting style. My previous painting style was realististic/impressionistic. My present style is abstract. The size is 16 x 20 inches.

Who are your favorite artists? My present (and they change) favorite artists are Brice Marden and Sean Scully.


Artist: Roger Sadler
Title: The Leaving and Purple Painting
Website: http://www.rogersadler.com/

Ruby Farias, Scottsdale, AZ

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was passionate about art as long as I can remember… I loved doing crafts with my mother as a child. In school, I doodled a lot and in high school I think I took every art class that was available. Although in my adult life I took somewhat of a hiatus to work on my “corporate career”, I came full circle in 2001 and reconnected with my passion. It was then that I promised myself that I would never put my brush down again.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. It was my first piece that I sold to someone I didn’t know. It was my first gallery show and I was thrilled to see the tab on the wall announcing to all that “Lavender Morning” was sold. It felt great and I was so happy that someone out there could love a piece of art that I created. It is a great feeling when the public enjoys my work. I want my work is to provide energy and to brighten up ones soul.

Who are your favorite artists? It is the works that are created with somewhat of an abstract technique, bright colors and details that make you wonder what is going on in that piece that attracts me. Of course, there are works done by familiar artists like Monet, Van Gogh, Kahlo, Klee and Matisse that I truly enjoy; not only in their work but in who they were and what their story was.

Artist: Ruby Farias
Title: Nights Magic
Medium: Acrylic, Gel on Canvas, 16″ X 20″
Website: http://www.rubyfariasdesigns.com

Courtney Jacobs, Pleasanton, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? Drawing was one of my earliest ways to play.  My mom told me that my preschool teacher had contacted her out of concern for my “different” drawings…and for the fact that I spent so much of my time drawing.  Painting didn’t come until waaaay later in my teenage years.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I had a large abstract painting (Big Bang) on display at a local theater event.  At the artist reception I was approached by TWO people who were interested in purchasing the painting.  I was completely ecstatic to be in such “demand”, and ended up selling the painting to the first buyer for over $1000 (big bucks for me at the time).  The buyer still comes to a few of my events each year to check out the progress.

Who are your favorite artists? I have become a big fan of Gerhard Richter.  He is so versatile, working between photo-realistic painting, and completely colorful non-figurative painting.  Jackson Pollock‘s action paintings were also a big inspiration for me.

Artist: Courtney Jacobs
Title: Trummerzackam
Medium: Acrylic on panel, 36×60 inches
Website: http://www.courtneyjanejacobs.com/

Patricia Corbett, Wallingford, CT

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was drawing figures, horses, etc. as a child and would win little awards in grammar school. In high school I was known for my art.  But after high school graduation and 3 years of night school, I went back to college majoring in music applied in voice.  My professional career as a singer was very satisfying. 10 years ago I retired from music and rekindled my art career.  It has been very enjoyable.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I sold my first piece of art at Zoe & Floyd Art Gallery in CT.

Who are your favorite artists? Edgar Alwin Payne, Richard Schmidt, Mary Cassatt, John F. Carlson, and Franz A. Bischoff.

Artist: Patricia Corbett
Title: Summertime on the Merritt
Medium: Oil on canvas
Website: http://www.patriciacorbett.blogspot.com/

Eric Valdez, Alhambra, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I’ve been creative from as far back as I can remember. My earliest memory of doing anything creative is drawing an Easter bunny at a YMCA after school program when I was 5. From then on I kept drawing, but I never considered it a talent. It was just something I did. I still don’t consider my artistic abilities a talent. They’re more like skills that I’ve been honing for over 25 years.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. The first exhibition that I was ever in kind of set a pretty high benchmark for any other group shows that I’ve been a part of because during the opening I sold both of the pieces that I had submitted. I picked up painting in the early 2000s as a hobby and then stopped when my record collecting hobby took over. Getting back into painting a couple years later was dumb luck and becoming a visual artist was something that I had never set out to do, so it was hard for me to wrap my head around the fact that I had sold two paintings in my first show. Those paintings were done to fit into the theme of the show so I didn’t have a personal connection to them beyond the work that I put into them, but having such strong reactions to pieces that I had painted motivated me to keep going.

Who are your favorite artists? One of my biggest influences is Neal Breton (Google him!), my friend and mentor who dragged me kicking and screaming into his studio and gave me the confidence to show my work off. I also really dig Jean-Michel BasquiatBanksyAndy WarholRoy LichtensteinShepard Fairey, and pop art and street art in general. Comic books also have had a huge influence on me and some of my favorite comic book artists are Frank MillerJack KirbyTim SaleBruce TimmJim Steranko and John Romita, Sr..

Artist: Eric Valdez
Title: Vicente Fernandez
Medium: Vinyl, acrylic, spray paint, 18×24 inches
Website: http://ericvaldezart.com/

 




Let the storks fly! – Interview with an Artist, part 2

I’m often asked to personally deliver a sculpture to its new home to help with placement and installation.  For me, it’s always a special experience to be involved in the process.  I can’t say it’s close to bringing one of my daughters home from the hospital, but it has its similarities.

It’s a quiet ride. High alert. Straps are tight.  Roads seem bumpier, traffic faster and driving is very defensive.  A block feels like a mile and 35 mph feels like 65.  The arrival is met with smiles, a bunch of ooooohs and fondling.  Unloading is sacred.  Then the parade.  The band soon fades and the crowd thins.  It’s quiet again and the world spins just a bit differently.

Here are three more deliveries.  So, let the storks fly…

Jana Ireijo, Solvang, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I always knew I had a gift for drawing and art, but for years it was a hobby, nothing more. It wasn’t until undergraduate school that an art class changed my life. It was Introduction to Oil Painting. I remember sitting at the easel, smelling the paint, and feeling the way it felt on the brush, under my fingers. It was instantaneous – that knowledge that I had found my calling. I knew that I could make that paint do anything I wanted. Years later, time has humbled that ego, but the paint itself never fails. I start mixing it on the palette, and once again time stands still.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I often think of the first painting I sold. I wish I had the name of the guy who bought it, so I could check up on it! It was at an art fair in Chicago. He came back twice to see it, before he finally purchased it. I remember being so flattered, because had a small house which he took great pride in. Every piece of art and furniture had a specific memory or meaning to him. It was a painting of a bulldog I was really attached to, and had a difficult time letting it go. I imagine where it hangs on his living room wall. Does he still love it? Is my painting happy?

Who are your favorite artists? I remember being struck the first time I saw Andrew Wyeth‘s “Christina’s World.” I myself was a teenager, and the sense of isolation was just devastating. I am entranced by the symbolism of Northern Renaissance painters. The artist I most identify with (and wish I could paint like!) is Francis Bacon.

Artist: Jana Ireijo
Title: LOVE ME
Medium: Oil on canvas, 48×48 inches
Website: http://www.janaireijo.com

Anna Marie Francesco, Upland, CA
When did you first discover your creative talents? I was doing my undergraduate studies at Cal Poly Pomona & I could not decide what to declare my major in. I was discussing my major options with my father & he said, “Why don’t you major in art?…You have always been creative.” I decided to give it a try. I changed my major to Fine Art & never looked back.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. One sale I will never forget was to the President of Claremont Graduate University, Dr. Robert Klitgaard. He selected me to be the recipient of the President’s Art Purchase Award & my piece currently hangs in the President’s Mansion.  I was very honored.

Who are your favorite artists? Lee Bontecou, Mark Rothko, Mark Ryden, Barbara Kruger, Joshua Okon, David Amico, Chris Burton, Chuck Close, Frida Kahlo, Jackson Pollock, Jay Defeo, Lynda Benglis, Jimmy Gleason, Damien Hirst, Takashi Murakami, Anish Kapoor, BanksyJohn Baldessari & many many more…..

Artist: Anna Marie Francesco
Title: Untitled
Medium: Joint compound & spray paint on canvas.
Website: http://amfineartsite.com

Sherrie Parenteau, Plainfield, CT

When did you first discover your creative talents? I first discovered that I was an artist when I was about 6 years old my father told my sisters and I to all draw a picture of his truck, he was a cross country truck driver, we did as asked and to his  surprise (and mine) my drawing was quite accurate and highly realistic. I knew then that I was given a gift.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. My most memorable sale was  August 2009.  I  had won a one women show in a regional competition  in Mystic CT. and had invited my collectors. One of the collectors that came brought her family with her. As I was talking with her daughter about a painting that her mother had lent me for the show she mentioned that she thought it was odd that I didn’t mention on the painting label that  the painting was in the collection of Sally Jessy Raphael (the former talk show host) I was astonished that the collector I had meet with may times before was in infamous talk show host. Since then Sally and her husband Karl have been collecting my work and currentlly have 8 of my pieces in their collection.

Who are your favorite artists? My favorite artists include but are not limited to… Manet, Vermeer, Velazquez, Alyssa Monks, Alex KanevskyPaul Fenniak, and Winslow Homer.

Artist: Sherrie Parenteau
Title: The Secret
Medium: Oil on panel, 48×60 inches
Website: http://www.sherrieparenteau.com

Interview with an Artist…part 1

Over the next few weeks, you’ll find internationally diverse artist interviews revealing thoughts on their personal creative discoveries, their intimate and memorable “red dot” stories and their exclusive artist guest list.

Sign up today to get future interviews delivered to your Inbox.  Also, feel free to recommend your favorite artist for a featured interview.

Enjoy ~ Paul

Katrin Jurati, Los Angeles, CA
When did you first discover your creative talents? I remember very distinctly, in first grade, the teacher speaking to someone else about me, as I had the revelation, drawing my bird Hansi in his cage (that the rungs of the cage had to be drawn first, with the bird behind so he appeared within it) while hearing “she’s the best artist in the class.”  I was shocked.  That was the first moment I identified myself as artist.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I hate to say I forgot which piece I sold first.  In Buffalo, I sold out 3 years worth of work, so it’s a bit of a blur.  The connection to each collector, of seeing their collection in their home, was amazing.  Unfortunately, out of that work, I remember the piece that I didn’t sell most, a heavy metal sculpture.  Instead of excepting $3000 I wanted $4000 and ended up putting it in storage and then lugging it to California to collect dust downstairs in the garage.  Probably my favorite sale was at the Anderson Gallery.  The collectors wanted it delivered to South Carolina, and invited me down for a week at the beach.  Precious memory.

Who are your favorite artists? My parents had a Picasso drawing book of nudes you can be sure I studied for years.  He’s still my favorite, loved the museum in Paris.  As a child Vasarely made a great impact on my first Museum visit, later punk, with all it’s emotive expression.  Cave Painting, Indian painting on buckskin, El Greco, Gericault, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Kahlo, Ana Mendieta, Baldessari, Godard, Agnes Varde, Louise Bourgeois, Rothko, Sautin, Goya, William Blake, Henry Darger, Raymond Pettibon, Monet, Eva Hess, Paul Klee, Philip Guston, and Lily Van Der Stokker easily begin the list.  Lately, I’ve been into Vera, the designer.

Artist: Katrin Jurati
Title: Grit in the girl/Puts punk in the pearl
Medium: Ink on silk – each piece (4 total) is 56″ x 6″ inches
Website: http://katrinjurati.com

Kristine Harper,  Copenhagen, Denmark
When did you first discover your creative talents?
It is hard to say exactly when I first discovered my creative talents – but I seriously started experimenting with and investigating my creativity when I was studying art. I have always been fascinated by color; I love how one, with color, can capture emotions and shape mental or physical landscapes.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. Selling art is kind of strange – my paintings are reflections of my thoughts, and thereby very personal. There are always paintings I am more attached to than others, and they are the hardest ones to let go.

Who are your favorite artists? I am very fond of legends in abstract expressionism like Mark Rothko and Jackson Pollock, but also Gerhard Richter and Danish artist Per Kirkeby inspire me.

Artist: Kristine Harper
Title: New beginnings
Medium: Acrylic paint on canvas, 100 x 100 cm/ 39.4 x 39.4 inches
Website: http://kristineharper.sat0ri.com/

Kara Joslyn, Oakland, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I think it was before I can remember. My mom tells me that I was drawing and arranging trinkets/objects ever since she can remember. I think I realized I was an artist in second grade, though. The class drew portraits of a different student every week and then the student acting as muse would pick her or his favorite drawing to put up in class until the next round. One week we drew our teacher, Ms. Nielsen. My drawing wasn’t picked, and I couldn’t fathom why – it was my masterpiece – so I asked her why I hadn’t been selected. She told me it was because the drawing was inappropriate. I was confused. I pressed her – why did she think so? She pointed to the bust area of my rendered portrait – then I realized… I was the only student who had given her breasts (denoted by one W-shaped line). I felt it was completely unfair since I was just being accurate, and tried not to cry – until I got home.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I was most excited when I sold a piece to my favorite professor, Linda, and when I sold a dyptich to a Rock Star, Tina from The Bobby Teens.

Who are your favorite artists? David Bowie, Nick Blinko, De Chirico, Kay Sage, Judy Chicago, Vija Celmins, Matisse, klee, Justin Olerud, Travis Wyche, Fritz Lang, Johannes Itten, NagelHunx and his PunxPeter Seville, Ertè, Nellè, Leslie Shows, Laura Owenskandinsky, arthur dove, the ancient greeks, the makers of the venus(es) of villandorf…the list could just continue on.

Artist: Kara Joslyn
Title: Vista Equinox Sunset
Medium: Graphite and acrylic on paper,  22 x 20 inches
Website: http://karajoslyn.com

Sara Joseph, Bangalore, India

When did you first discover your creative talents? When I was 10, my best friend used to sit in class and draw cartoons from newspapers during free hours and I used to see that and wait for her to finish drawing as I wanted to color it. One day she said, “Look , why don’t  you try drawing ?”  I said, “No I can’t draw, I can only color “. But finally, through persistent encouragement I drew Winnie the Pooh from the newspaper. The drawing turned out to be really good, which marked the beginning of art in my life.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I had sold my first work to a friend of mine.  But the most memorable experience was when I sold a work  during a fair called ‘Chitra Santhe‘ where thousands of artists come together to sell their works here in Bangalore, India every year. It was in 2009 when this man came to my stall and checked a work of mine when I wasn’t there. He came back the 2nd time and asked my friend if the artist was back and I weren’t. Then he came back the third time looking for me to buy my work from me, but again I wasn’t there and he bought the painting when I wasn’t there. I was feeling really bad that this was the first time someone eagerly wanted to meet me and I wasn’t there all the three times he had come. Then finally in the evening while we had to pack up he came with his family to tell me he loved my work and wanted to meet in person to tell me how much he loved it.  I was overwhelmed by his gesture.

Who are your favorite artists? My works are a combination of abstraction and realism. I use an abstract background and I keep the portraits as real as possible. This is to show that it’s not the society that am interested in but the people and what the common man in India is like. I love to do portraits, as faces carry the emotions, of a person.  And in abstraction I use squares in the background which represent society which I used as I was inspired by Piet Mondrian and his representation of colors and geometric forms. My favorite artist in realism or I would say photorealism is Chuck Close. I love the way he uses faces of people or his self portraits in different styles to portray a skill beyond photorealism. The expressions are very neutral but the massive sizes he works on and his technique is amazing. Others, to name a few, that have inspired me are Salvador Dali, Michelangelo, Monet, Jeff Koons, David Kassan, Amrita Shergill and TV Santosh.

Artist: Sara Joseph
Title: Bounded
Medium: Oil and acrylic on canvas
Website: http://paintedpainter.blogspot.com/