Tag Archives: Picasso

Fountain Arts Fair – NYC, March 9-11, 2012

In anticipation of this weekend’s (March 9-11) NYC Fountain Art Fair, I asked participant and past Arts PR Group interviewee Agni Zotis  her thoughts.  Also, a  short chat with  Santa Monica artist Kathleen O’Connell Kaller.

Getting ready for an exhibit, solo or joint, can be its own reality TV Agni Zotisshow….the diverse mix of personalities, stress of deadlines and production issues.  Can you share a personal experience with Fountain?  Art fairs and the art world in general are reality tv dramas, entertainment should be inevitable. This year the Fountain Art Fair is at the 69th Regiment Armory, 68 Lexington Avenue  @ 25th Street, the very first exhibition space for the Armory Show in 1913.

I was invited by my friend, sculptor Bernard Klevickas, that had the idea for a Bernard Klevickasband of artists to come together and present in a salon style exhibition, 72 artists including some friends, in booth E212 producing artwork right now in NYC. It’s an opportunity to show work, collaborate, see art, friends, parties, represent a part of the NYC art energy I am, as the world pours in to experience it.  As an active artist I have the ability to create my experience.

 I’m showing “In Haiti Kids are Eating Mud Cookies What Heels Should I Wear” at the curators request and also the painting  “Liquify Earth” the idea of the being, the self, consuming the globe, unifying, becoming one with all,   Universal Consciousness.

Thanks Agni.  From the FAF folks…the “Fair is an exhibition of avant-garde artwork founded to leverage support for smaller independent galleries to gain access to larger collectors and critics. In addition to cutting-edge art, visitors to the fair can enjoy signature elements such as on-site performance art, a major street art installation, and musical performances that Fountain has become known for integrating into the art fair experience. From presenting just 3 local exhibitors at its first fair in 2006, Fountain has grown to represent over 30 international exhibitors and independent artist projects…

Paul ShampineBuy discounted tickets online or for more info:  http://www.fountainartfair.com
Best, Paul
Paul Shampine

Jumping to the West Coast, our interviews continue with Stanta Monica artist Kathleen Kaller.

Kathleen O’Connell Kaller
Kathleen Kaller-Luminous Tide

When did you first discover your creative talents? My mother introduced me to creativity as a young child.  Getting crafty on school projects and painting on shells. However the first time I realized I actually had a talent for it was in a high school art class.  One of our first projects was to sketch and draw with charcoal.  We were assigned to draw and shade an image of our hands and then turn it into something.  I drew my hand and then turned my arm into a snake! It was quite fierce now that I look back.  Having studied Hindu mythology recently, I now know snakes represents the life force, strength and rebirth. But I suppose the point of the story is that after seeing what I had created I was a little in shock that I could make something so detailed and I also felt proud. Like I found what  I was good at.  The images were displayed in a glass case near the cafeteria and I got really good feedback from other students. I guess it was at that moment! Having pride as I walked to the lunch room everyday.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold.  Every time I sell something is memorable moment! It really reinforces the fact that I can live and prosper as an artist.  I refuse to believe in the myth of the struggling artist.  But the very first art show I had was pretty memorable.  I didn’t know what to expect!  I had sold a few pieces to friends and family along the way but to sell to someone you don’t really know means alot to me.  It means you reached an audience.  After my first show I sold a piece called “Letting Go”.  It was one of my first abstract paintings were I literally let go when I was painting it.  I had been creating more impressionistic work and at this point I was wanting to be more free and abstract. In addition my client  that bought the work commissioned me to create 2 more paintings to add to  “Letting Go” creating an original Triptych for her.  This was one of my first sales and commissions at the same time.  This was a very exciting moment for me.

Favorite museum? Any museum I walk into is my favorite! Since I was little I loved going to museums on school trips.  There is an energy that is palpable, inspiring and divine.  Its quiet, meditative, and the life of each painting vibrates Sam Francis - Norton Simon Museumoff the walls and into your psyche.  One of my favorites in California is The Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena.  There hangs one of my all-time favorite mural paintings by Sam Francis.  It takes up an entire wall hanging 13 x 20 feet. It’s drippy, vibrant  and has emotional impact at first glance.  This work has been an influential in the way I create art. 

If you were to give a room full of emerging artists one bit of advice, what would that be? Your studio is sacred space.  Get weird as much as possible.  Be grateful for everything.  Little prayers to the universe work.  If there is something or someone that speaks to you have a conversation, there is something you need to hear. When the going gets tough keep creating.

If you were to receive an “Artist of the Year Award,” who would be the first person you would thank and why? My family and for all those teachers along the way. My husband especially. When I left a decent-paid job Revelation-Kathleen Kallerto paint my husband was 100% supportive. As an artist himself he realizes the importance of the creative process. He has infused my work with encouragement and love. He also gives me really good criticism on my work and he is the only person I may alter a painting for after hearing his commentary. My mother has also been really helpful in the process as she is a painter too and has great tips. I truly feel blessed to have the resources to be an artist. It is a magical profession.

Who are your favorite artists? These artists continue to inspire, mentor and influence my work and journey as an artist. SACO (Susan Ann Christiana O’Connell), Sam Francis, Vibul Wonprasat, Francoise Gilot, Saule Piktys, Sage Vaughn, Trudy Montgomery, Darren Waterston, Picasso, William de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Joan Mitchell, Lee Krasner, Benzo Theodore, Laura Amazzone, Elaine de Kooning, and Mary Addison Hackett.

Artist: Kathleen O’Connell Kaller
Title: Luminous Tide
Medium: Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 40”x40”
Website: http://www.kathleenkaller.com

Paul ShampinePaul Shampine

10,000 hours

I recently asked a friends nine year-old daughter (Lily) how lacrosse was going.  “It’s a lot of fun, but I’m having a hard time catching the ball.”  Instantly the self appointed expert gene flared and I caught myself lecturing on the importance of “practice.” Practice or punishment in a K-6 thesaurus play book. Continuing, I stuttered with inspiration that I read somewhere that it takes 10,000 hours to become an “expert” (Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell). Her eyes widened and her voice calmly whispered “cool.”  Confused, I thought…did she think I said dollars…not hours…like if you practice, I’ll give you $10,000?  Lily ran off and grabbed her lacrosse stick and darted outside.  I just gave her a 10,000 hour license to have fun.  Need one?

Paul ShampineCheck out these license holders that are great with their stick…
Best, Paul
Paul Shampine


Jennifer Weiss

Dog Run-Jennifer Weiss

When did you first discover your creative talents? I think it was in the 3rd grade. Another student and I would perform these one on one drawing contests and the other students would be the judges (I’m not sure where the teacher was while this was going on). I was told early on that I had some talent, but it took me a very long time to really believe it; as I got older I realized I had to create in some way in order to stay sane. At times I would make paintings or drawings that I’d feel very good about, but it would often be followed by intense doubt and insecurity. It wasn’t until my early thirties, when a professor who I really respected told me I was talented did I actually begin to believe that I might have something worth pursuing. From then on I felt more of a commitment to my work and things really started to grow from that point.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. The first work I ever sold was a group of eight small 8×10″ paintings of coffee cups with a narrative theme. It happened during an open studio weekend in Red Hook where I used to live and work. A couple came in and purchased the entire series altogether for $400 for the eight paintings. I hadn’t expected anyone would really buy a painting from me, and so it came as a total surprise. Fearful they’d change their mind I threw out the first price that came to me. I miss those paintings…

Who are your favorite artists?  Some of my favorite artists include Terry Winters, Enrique Martinez Celaya, Herbert Brandl, and Willem De Kooning.

Artist: Jennifer Weiss
Title: Dog Run
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Dimensions: 72”x72”
Website: http://www.jenweiss.com

Cat Tesla
Endless & Outside of the Box

When did you first discover your creative talents? When I was 3 or 4 years old I made a birthday card for my grandmother using paint and collage, complete with a Hallmark® crown on the back (in goldenrod Crayola®, of course). Since then I’ve been drawing, painting, or making something. I believe it’s who I am part of my genetic code so to say.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold.  Honestly, I don’t remember my first sale! What I do remember is the last day of an art show about 7 years ago when a lady approached me asking about my “Outside of the Box” series. She really liked the work and said she had a wall that she measured and thought that she needed 50 paintings from this series for the spot she had in mind. I replied by saying you mean 15, right? No, she said. Fifty. Five-oh.” I thought she was pulling my leg. She asked me to come to her home after the show to see the space and bring whatever I had left.

My husband was with me and we were on the fence whether to go. She was wearing a t-shirt and shorts. It was very hot. We told her we’d call when we were all packed up. Once we got everything packed up, we figured “why not? Off we went.  It was beautiful. It was big. It was unbelievable!  The wall space was perfect for 50 “Outside of the Box” paintings. She purchased the 15 I had and commissioned me for the other 35.

Life is full of challenges, surprises, and joy. I’ll never forget this experience and how it taught me to be open and to believe that anything is possible. You just never know how God will bless you. I’m grateful for every day as an artist. For me, painting is the most life-affirming thing to do.

Who are your favorite artists?  William Turner, Jackson Pollock, and Georgia O’Keefe.

Artist: Cat Tesla
Title: Endless, 48″x48″, acrylic on canvas – Outside of the Box, 10″x10″/ea, mixed media on birch
Website: http://artbycat.com

Brooke Harker
Taxi 213-Brooke Harker

When did you first discover your creative talents? I grew up in a very creative home…so if I wasn’t putting on a show, making clothing for my troll collection or hosting dance contests between my sister and I (I always judged and won them too…which she never questioned), I was watching my mom paint…I began attending university art classes with her when I was seven, sitting next to her easel. When she worked on her art homework, I got to participate on a parallel project for me, and she taught me about what she was learning. I don’t remember ever not making things.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold.  I was probably five years old painting on rocks from the driveway with my best friend Ashley and trying to sell them for 5 cents each. It was a solid business plan, except we set our table of merchandise at the top of her winding driveway in the woods, private property with no food traffic or passing cars…and then we waited. Where were all the people? Didn’t they see our sign at the bottom of the driveway, “Rocks for Sale” with an arrow? Eventually we moved the rocks to the bottom of the hill, but were still shocked that nobody stopped to buy rocks that were hand painted for only 5 cents!  I’m telling this story…because it is possible that a rock sold before we gave up and started making hors d’oeuvres of graham cracker, frosting and marshmallows and delivering them door to door to our neighbors.

The first offer to buy one of my paintings came when I was 10. My elementary school had an art show in the evening, I wasn’t there but my teacher, Mrs. Smart, let me know that a man who collected children’s art wanted to buy my painting. I don’t remember now if I sold him the painting or held onto it…but I didn’t see it in the years that followed… I mainly remember the turmoil of deciding whether to sell it or not…The offer was for $50. I was shocked. The painting itself was from a class study of Matisse. We took turns posing for the class and painting Matisse inspired backgrounds. I was the only student to paint the boy modeling purple. I gave no explanations at the time. Perhaps the idea seemed original or abstract, but in truth I didn’t want to be racist. I had learned on Martin Luther King Jr Day not to pay attention to a persons skin color, and now I was about to paint Eric, the only African American boy in my class…If I chose brown paint…it would have meant I saw his skin color and I surely didn’t want to be racist…so I made him purple…but I still felt odd about the choice. Again another possible first sale…I for sure remember selling a painting of elephants when I was in high school to my elementary school guidance counselor.

Who are your favorite artists?  Rachael McCampbellChris ZambonRoderick SmithChuck Guppert, Paul GarveyMichael FlohrAshley HaganGregg Chadwick,Wendy MorrisMike Brouse, Carolyn ColeDaphne StammerGabrielle PoolRimi Yang,  James VerbickyClaudia Concha PereaBobby Logic, Charles Crossley, Hilary TaubMolly CourcelleMichael SituJean-Michel BasquiatPicasso, Renoir.

Artist: Brooke Harker
Title: Taxi 213
Medium: Japanese ink, oil and acrylic on canvas
Dimensions: 36″ x 48″
Website: http://www.brookeharker.com

Kellie Thomas-Walker
The Invited-Kellie Thomas-Walker

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was brought up with a love for art originating from my artist mother. I dabbled here and there between creative writing, poetry, never centering on a creative outlet. Then, after many obstacles and many heartbreaks I started to take up sketching.  My threshold to cross which brought me into my world of colors, lines, and beauty was the progression of becoming a mother to my four daughters.  One day my mother set me in front of a canvas, with unlimited paint, brushes-and let me go. That day I found myself, and the world around me has forever changed.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold.  My most treasured piece I sold was a commission piece to our dear friends.  They gave me a color pallet to run off of, and gave me complete free artistic reign.  Three panels, reaching close to 10 ft across came to known as “New Jerusalem”. I poured my soul into that piece. It was where I started prayer to God in my work. A constant connection to Him.

Who are your favorite artists?  Without a doubt my all time favorite is my mother, Diane Heesen. She is such an amazing woman, and diverse in her artistic nature. My other favorites are Osnat Tzadoc, and Salvador Dali. Dali is a definite influence in my charcoal/pen drawings.

Artist: Kellie Thomas-Walker
Title: The Invited
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
Dimensions: 48”x48”
Website: http://kelliewalkerabstractartist.blogspot.com/


Interview with an Artist – Nancy Jaffee

Nancy Jaffee, Weston CT

Abstract in blue and brownWhen did you first discover your creative talents? I didn’t really
know I had any artistic talents until I was an adult. But my mother
was artistic. She worked as a clothing designer and a decorator and I always appreciated the way she put colors together in her work. My sister used me as a guinea pig in grad school for her PHD in Psychology. And after taking all her tests, she said I should pursue a career in the arts but I never really did anything about it.  It wasn’t until I was in my 30’s that I started taking formal art classes and realized this was truly something I wanted to do for the rest of my life.

Some visual artists describe crossing a threshold where they see new colors, shapes, forms, shadows and movement. Did younude looking up experience this kind of artistic “awakening?” It happen at The Rye Arts Center. When the teacher was explaining how to convert three dimensional space onto a two dimensional page she taught us about foreshortening, cast shadows, reflected light, modeling…volume. It was eye-opening for me
because it all worked. It was like unlocking a door and learning how to
see.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. My first sale was to my neighbor. It was a sketch from a life drawing
class. Just a quick one minute pose. But she liked it, had it framed
and hung it in her living room. She had a lot of beautiful art that she
collected, so I felt honored to have my little throw away amongst her
really nice paintings. I think I charged her $20 for the sketch.

Who are your favorite artists? My favorite artists… long list… but
I would start with Michelangelo… I was lucky enough to travel to Europe several times as a child and was exposed to some of the most beautiful masterpieces of
the world. But the David really blew me away. I love Whistler, JS Sargent, Cezanne, Modigliani, Matisse, Picasso (especially his blue period), Egon Schiele, Munch (the Storm is my favorite), Clyfford StillMilton Avery, Jim Dine… too many to mention.

Do you “see” your paintings before you create it or is it a
work-in-progress? I often start out with an idea for a nude or
something representational. But the abstract pieces are more works in
progress. I usually try to start with a palette and work from there.

When a painting takes on a mood….say a dark one. Do you feel likeescape
you need to exist in that mood to continue with the painting? When I’m focused on painting, I want to create something evocative and
interesting and I’m just trying to do that. What’s so cathartic about
painting is that it takes you out of your own head while you’re doing
it. It can also give you an outlet to express what’s inside you. I
think the emotions come first and then the painting.

I think my outlook is naturally somewhat dark. I see people as alone,
my figures are always alone, they sometimes seem isolated. I think a
heavily clouded sky is more interesting and than a bright blue clear
one. My least favorite paintings are “Spring” and “Painted Flowers” in
terms of their content and color. I was experimenting more with
technique on those, using a calligraphy pen in the first and a palette
knife in the latter.

You mentioned that you like Picasso…specifically his blue period.Picasso
Some feel that his blue period was a reflection of depression, while others say blue paint was cheaper and he couldn’t afford other colors at that time. What do you think? I like his blue period because it seems more compassionate than his later work. Like the famous painting of the woman with the iron. She’s exhausted, endlessly working,  overwrought, poor. She’s not glib or superficial. Looking at her evokes powerful emotions. The painting has soul.

In general though, if you ask most people what their favorite color is,Rockbottom
they say blue. Blue is rich and soothing. It can also be considered
sad as in a blue motel room or a blue mood. But art is in the eye of
the viewer. It’s highly subjective. I think the artist may have one
thing in mind and the viewer something entirely different and both are
equally valid.

male nudeIs there a particular painting of yours that evoked polar views or
moods from a viewer? If so, which one and describe what they “saw.” This is a funny story. A friend of mine on Facebook saw my male nude
who is masturbating in the painting, and thought it was a woman. To be fair, he was looking at it on his phone, so it was only 3″ big. Mainly in my drawings people have experienced the nudes as sad when I just felt they were relaxed, neither happy nor sad. Some people try to understand literally what I’ve painted as in “Escape.” Like what exactly am I depicting? Are there mountains in the foreground? Is that a lake beneath them? Others will just see it as a seascape and not wonder about the realism of the specific shapes. I can’t really think
of any that have evoked polar reactions from different people except
that some will love a piece while others aren’t impressed at all.

I’m also a fan of Sargent. My favorite Sargent piece (El Jaleo) is in
one of my favorite Museums…the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. It’s one of those paintings that you have to seeWhistler's Mother
up-close-and-personal.  Do you have a “must see” that you re-visit or moved you when you viewed the original? I was really moved by
Whistler’s “Mother.” When I saw it, I couldn’t stop looking at it. The
mood was so compelling, the gray on gray, the contrast of white on
black, the quiet stillness of the subject almost trancelike.

Sargent’s work is just so elegant and beautiful. One of his paintings that
impressed me the most is in a permanent collection at a museum in
Scotland and it’s titled, “The Lady Agnew”. She is seated and dressed
in white. The skin tones are flawlessly smooth and the eyes seem as
though they are laughing. I also love the painting “Madame X” at the
Metropolitan Museum in NYC.

Favorite museum? Having grown up in NYC, my favorite museums are the Metropolitan and the Museum of Modern Art. It’s always a pleasure to spend an afternoon there rediscovering my favorite masterpieces. I recently discovered the work of Clyfford Still and his work has had an influence on several of
my most recent pieces.

What advice would you give to an artist just starting out? Well, since I Nancy Jaffeetoo consider myself an artist just starting out, I can only offer what I say to myself. Try to be the best that you can be.  Compete only with yourself. While there will always be someone out there that you find more talented or more accomplished then you don’t let that discourage you. There is room for all of our artistic expressions. Just enjoy the process and remember that the nature of
creation is creativity itself.

Nancy’s website: http://www.nancyjaffee.com

Paul ShampinePaul Shampine

Agni Zotis and the Agni Gallery, Interview with an Artist

As most know, the Northeast has experienced below average temperatures and above average snowfall.  Normally not really an issue for me, but this year I’m heating my domicile with a wood stove.  Yes, it’s as nice as it sounds, but it has its challenges.

Glacial FruitThrough waist-deep snow, I trek to my studio, dig out the door that has been unopened since the Winter Solstice to fetch chains to strap to the wheels of a snow-locked 4WD sculpture/recycling/loan-to-friend/move-that-stuff/wood truck. Mixed emotions struck hard when I broke the seal to my sanctuary and moved past half sculptures, new-found rocks from the Fall and the scent of metal.  Yes, I can smell metal.

While relocating a 1/2 cord of wood from the edge of the property, movement and muscle use were reminiscent of those warm summer sculpting days.  Feeling Paul Shampinea bit of a void and some artistic melancholy, I hear muffled chimes from my Blackblerry.  It’s Agni Zotis.  We chat a bit about her interview and my artistic soul is lift again.  Thanks Agni.  The interviews continue…

Agni Zotis, NYC

When did you first discover your creative talents? I knew art was my thing when I was very young and I could express my self clearly through sketches at school.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. At 19 I was commissioned to paint a mural in a kids room,  got $1500 for a couple of days and I loved the fact kids would be playing and sleeping under my heavenly sky.

Who are your favorite artists? In my youth I was interested in Bosch, Caravaggio, Picasso, Dali, Pollock and now Marina A since her performance at the MOMA.

Looking for love in all the wrong places-Agni Zotis“Looking for love in all the wrong places” is one of my favorite paintings.  Can you give some personal perspective on this piece?Looking for love in all the wrong places” is the first painting from a series called “Exploration of Love” in 2004-05 exploring the emotions of falling in love. this painting examines the need for a lover to devour, engulf their loved one consumed by passion. Falling in love is a feeding frenzy of the soul.

What drew you to Byzantine Iconography? Interested in mysticism in art of ancient worlds, after graduating Hunter in 1993,  I apprenticed with a Serbian monk Makarios, in church in Astoria NYC where I learned Byzantine Iconography and fresco painting using ancient techniques.  All artists should have technique and the ability to paint what they wish without technical limitations. I chose one of the oldest as it has been around for 2000 years, I still use similar methods with pigments, gold leafs and layering, I just make it contemporary and relevant to now, modernize traditions.

Recalling your international travels, what three countries had the most influence on your work and why?

1). NYC because I grew up, live and always have my studios here, the rhythm and vibe of my city is an essential part of my thought process, influences and work.

2). Greece because it’s my roots, I’m interested in philosophy, mythology, movement of knowledge within a culture.

3).  India because it showed me life and death in one spectrum.  I learned about mortality and immortality, living and process of it. It’s where I touched lepers, broke bread with tribal and dined with kings alike.

What’s the history of the Agni Gallery? Agni Gallery was an organic evolution of my world in a special spot in the LES community. Ginsberg lived upstairs when he wrote the Howl, a storefront, transparent, raw with a sign reading “RATED R FOR RANDOM”  Both an exhibition space and my studio, I painted bodies of work with my doorsAgni Zotis open, spilling into the NYC street.  It was a creative underground hot spot for artists, intellectuals, poets, musicians from local and international, established and emerging, an important cultural movement in the art world, allowing people to connect (this is before Facebook and the virtual movement). I hosted and curated many exhibitions and events, giving opportunity to showcase artists, lots of process, I learned and lots and lots of fun. The Factory as some called it. Now I m involved with various projects in other spaces in NYC and internationally. Agni Gallery is a constantly evolving processes in progress and I work with great people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purification-Agni Zotis

Purification

 

 

 

 

 

 

Favorite gallery? I don’t have a favorite gallery although I like some much more than others.

Favorite museum? My favorite museum is RMA, I love the vibe in there.

If you were to give a room full of emerging artists one bit of advice, what would that be? To all artists, be honest and work from your depths.

If you were to receive an “Artist of the Year Award,” who would be the first person you would thank and why? I thank my mom and son, my greatest supporters and critics, keeping me in the light of what is real.

Agni’s Website: http://www.agnizotis.com

“Art is not…” Interview with an Artist, part 4

“Inspired” by Mr. Sadler’s comments below, I’ve found what others have to say what “art is not…”  I open with my friend Pablo and close with some reality:

Art is not the application of a canon of beauty but what the instinct and the brain can conceive beyond any canon. When we love a woman we don’t start measuring her limbs.” ~ Pablo Picasso

Art is not an investment” – VIDEOArne Glimcher, founder of Pace Gallery.

Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.”  ~ Edgar Degas

One of many collections – daughter Samantha @ 7, now 12 years old

“Start by remembering that teaching children about art is not just about showing them how to recognize a van Gogh or Picasso, it’s about preparing young minds for a future of invaluable experiences—art related or otherwise.” by Andrea Mulder-Slater (http://www.kinderart.com/artspeak/important.shtml)

Art is not a luxury.” Fresh Artists (http://www.freshartists.org), a non profit 501(c)(3) organization, created to help save art making in K-12 public schools.

The interviews continue….
Best, Paul
Paul Shampine

Roger Sadler, Temple TX

I am never inspired. Art is work. And I work. Within the process of work I may get excited about an idea and follow it out. Work and ideas. No inspiration: that is a late 19th early/ 20th century concept. Sorry to contradict you but making art is not magic; and inspiration bespeaks of magic. To conclude, art is work and ideas.

When did you first discover your creative talents? 14 years old.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. Selling The Leaving for 600 dollars was my biggest sell and biggest painting and most dear to me. THE LEAVING is not a horror painting despite appearances. It is about pain. The pain of a relationship breaking up and the child being abandoned, or being left with the clan behind the fence. The male is exiting the front of the picture. He is slumped with grief and depression. The women stays behind with the child, holding her hand. The characters are so depressed and in so much pain that “the flesh is stripped from their bones.” The painting is medium large, 5 ft x 5 ft.

The other painting is PURPLE PAINTING. It is an example of my current painting style. My previous painting style was realististic/impressionistic. My present style is abstract. The size is 16 x 20 inches.

Who are your favorite artists? My present (and they change) favorite artists are Brice Marden and Sean Scully.


Artist: Roger Sadler
Title: The Leaving and Purple Painting
Website: http://www.rogersadler.com/

Ruby Farias, Scottsdale, AZ

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was passionate about art as long as I can remember… I loved doing crafts with my mother as a child. In school, I doodled a lot and in high school I think I took every art class that was available. Although in my adult life I took somewhat of a hiatus to work on my “corporate career”, I came full circle in 2001 and reconnected with my passion. It was then that I promised myself that I would never put my brush down again.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. It was my first piece that I sold to someone I didn’t know. It was my first gallery show and I was thrilled to see the tab on the wall announcing to all that “Lavender Morning” was sold. It felt great and I was so happy that someone out there could love a piece of art that I created. It is a great feeling when the public enjoys my work. I want my work is to provide energy and to brighten up ones soul.

Who are your favorite artists? It is the works that are created with somewhat of an abstract technique, bright colors and details that make you wonder what is going on in that piece that attracts me. Of course, there are works done by familiar artists like Monet, Van Gogh, Kahlo, Klee and Matisse that I truly enjoy; not only in their work but in who they were and what their story was.

Artist: Ruby Farias
Title: Nights Magic
Medium: Acrylic, Gel on Canvas, 16″ X 20″
Website: http://www.rubyfariasdesigns.com

Courtney Jacobs, Pleasanton, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? Drawing was one of my earliest ways to play.  My mom told me that my preschool teacher had contacted her out of concern for my “different” drawings…and for the fact that I spent so much of my time drawing.  Painting didn’t come until waaaay later in my teenage years.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I had a large abstract painting (Big Bang) on display at a local theater event.  At the artist reception I was approached by TWO people who were interested in purchasing the painting.  I was completely ecstatic to be in such “demand”, and ended up selling the painting to the first buyer for over $1000 (big bucks for me at the time).  The buyer still comes to a few of my events each year to check out the progress.

Who are your favorite artists? I have become a big fan of Gerhard Richter.  He is so versatile, working between photo-realistic painting, and completely colorful non-figurative painting.  Jackson Pollock‘s action paintings were also a big inspiration for me.

Artist: Courtney Jacobs
Title: Trummerzackam
Medium: Acrylic on panel, 36×60 inches
Website: http://www.courtneyjanejacobs.com/

Patricia Corbett, Wallingford, CT

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was drawing figures, horses, etc. as a child and would win little awards in grammar school. In high school I was known for my art.  But after high school graduation and 3 years of night school, I went back to college majoring in music applied in voice.  My professional career as a singer was very satisfying. 10 years ago I retired from music and rekindled my art career.  It has been very enjoyable.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I sold my first piece of art at Zoe & Floyd Art Gallery in CT.

Who are your favorite artists? Edgar Alwin Payne, Richard Schmidt, Mary Cassatt, John F. Carlson, and Franz A. Bischoff.

Artist: Patricia Corbett
Title: Summertime on the Merritt
Medium: Oil on canvas
Website: http://www.patriciacorbett.blogspot.com/

Eric Valdez, Alhambra, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I’ve been creative from as far back as I can remember. My earliest memory of doing anything creative is drawing an Easter bunny at a YMCA after school program when I was 5. From then on I kept drawing, but I never considered it a talent. It was just something I did. I still don’t consider my artistic abilities a talent. They’re more like skills that I’ve been honing for over 25 years.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. The first exhibition that I was ever in kind of set a pretty high benchmark for any other group shows that I’ve been a part of because during the opening I sold both of the pieces that I had submitted. I picked up painting in the early 2000s as a hobby and then stopped when my record collecting hobby took over. Getting back into painting a couple years later was dumb luck and becoming a visual artist was something that I had never set out to do, so it was hard for me to wrap my head around the fact that I had sold two paintings in my first show. Those paintings were done to fit into the theme of the show so I didn’t have a personal connection to them beyond the work that I put into them, but having such strong reactions to pieces that I had painted motivated me to keep going.

Who are your favorite artists? One of my biggest influences is Neal Breton (Google him!), my friend and mentor who dragged me kicking and screaming into his studio and gave me the confidence to show my work off. I also really dig Jean-Michel BasquiatBanksyAndy WarholRoy LichtensteinShepard Fairey, and pop art and street art in general. Comic books also have had a huge influence on me and some of my favorite comic book artists are Frank MillerJack KirbyTim SaleBruce TimmJim Steranko and John Romita, Sr..

Artist: Eric Valdez
Title: Vicente Fernandez
Medium: Vinyl, acrylic, spray paint, 18×24 inches
Website: http://ericvaldezart.com/